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Superconducting Super Collider Collection,
1985-1992

Extent and Forms of Material: 4 cubic feet, including one videotape and 9 oversize folders (8 boxes)
Creator: Division of Science, Medicine and Society, National Museum of American History
Abstract: Collection assembled by Museum curators documents the efforts of persons in eight states to have the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), a particle accelerator, built in their state. Also documents efforts in each state to oppose locating the SSC in their state. The collection contains correspondence, press kits, posters, signs, bumper stickers, leaflets, handbills, clippings, photographs, and a videotape.
Repository: Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; archivescenter@si.edu; 202-633-3270; www.americanhistory.si.edu/archives
Collection Number: AC0538
Processing Note: Processed by Paul Lagasse (intern), August 9, 1996; supervised by Craig Orr, archivist
Acknowledgement Statement: Valuable information and suggestions about the SSC's history and archival legacy came from several people: Adrienne Kolb, Fermilab Archives; Steve Weiss, Virginia Tech; Joe Anderson, American Institute for Physics/Center for History of Physics; Marjorie Ciarlante, National Archives and Records Administration; Betsy Scroger, United States Department of Energy Archives; and Pat Gossel, Smita Dutta, and Ann Seeger of the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.

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Information for users of the collection

Conditions Governing Access: The collection is open for research use.
Physical Access: Researchers must handle unprotected photographs with gloves. Researchers must use reference copies of audio-visual materials. When no reference copy exists, the Archives Center staff will produce reference copies on an “as needed” basis, as resources allow.
Conditions Governing Reproduction and Use: Copyright held by the Smithsonian Institution. Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Reproduction permission from Archives Center: fees for commercial use.
Preferred Citation: [Title and date of item], Superconducting Super Collider Collection, 1985-1992, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, box number X, folder number XX, digital file number XXXXXXXX

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In-depth information about the collection

Administrative history
Scope and content
System of arrangement
Acquisition information
Custodial history
Related archival materials
Access points
Container listing

Administrative history

The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), if built, would have been the world's most expensive instrument for basic science. It would have allowed physicists to study the collisions of subatomic particles in conditions approximating those of the Big Bang, the beginning of the universe. The SSC design called for a 10-foot wide tunnel to be laid out in an oval pattern similar to a racetrack, approximately 53 miles in circumference and 14 miles in diameter. The tunnel, buried several hundred feet underground, would have contained nearly 10,000 superconducting magnets. Small clusters of buildings located above the tunnel were planned to house the SSC's offices, laboratories, and control facilities. All of these structures would have made the SSC the largest particle accelerator in the world and, at an estimated cost of between $4.4 and $11.8 billion, one of the largest public works projects ever undertaken in the United States.

Physicists planned to use the SSC's superconducting magnets to accelerate two streams of protons (particles with a positive electrical charge that forming part of the nucleus of an atom) to a velocity of 20 trillion electron-volts (TeV) in opposite directions within the tunnel's parallel beam tubes. They would then deflect the two streams into each other and study the particles that were created in the resulting high-speed collisions. From these events, physicists hoped to detect particles never seen before and learn more about the composition of matter.

In January 1987, President Reagan publicly declared his support for the proposed SSC, to be built under the authority of the Department of Energy (DOE). States were invited to submit site proposals for the project, and from the twenty-five states that responded, eight finalists were selected: Arizona, Colorado, Illinois, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas.

The huge scale of the SSC meant that it would have a significant environmental and cultural impact on the area selected. The SSC would, one source estimated, “require 16,000 acres of donated land, a flow of between 500 and 2,200 gallons of water a minute and up to 250-megawatts of power, as well as accessibility to a major airport, so the world's scientists can fly in and out."1

In many of the finalist states, opponents of the SSC organized and actively campaigned against the project. They raised issues such as the threat to uproot hundreds of people from their homes or create heavy tax and utility burdens. Opponents attended public hearings on SSC issues, distributed leaflets by mail and by hand, and conducted letter-writing campaigns to local politicians. In New York, Citizens Against the Collider Here (CATCH) was able to force the state to withdraw from the competition. Groups in other states learned from the New York group's experiences and used similar techniques in their own campaigns, sometimes adopting the name CATCH. As one CATCH activist recalled, “opponents were not against the SSC or basic sciences, however they did not believe that they should be forced out of their homes for the SSC.”2

Supporters of the SSC, on the other hand, addressed the concerns of the citizens by writing editorials or distributing pamphlets responding to particular issues or questions. Prominent city officials and politicians traveled to the proposed sites to discuss the economic and scientific benefits of the SSC, and cities distributed bumper stickers supporting the project. Scientists rebuffed claims that the SSC would produce large amounts of deadly radioactivity and contaminate the entire area. Supporters promised that, “the SSC project would bring federal funding, international prestige, and jobs—starting with 4,500 construction jobs, and later 2,500 full-time research staff positions.”3

In November 1988, the Department of Energy declared the winning site to be Ellis County, Texas, southwest of Dallas near the town of Waxahachie. Full-scale construction began three years later with the building of laboratory facilities for the design and manufacture of the SSC's superconducting magnets. Contractors began boring the main tunnel and several vertical access shafts in January 1993.

The anticipated tremendous costs that dogged the project eventually helped undermine it. In June 1992 and again in June 1993, the House voted to cancel funds for the SSC; both times, the Senate restored funding. However, in October 1993 the House rejected the Senate's second restoration, and President Clinton echoed Congress's decision to cancel further work on the SSC. The project received a small budget to support termination activities through 1996. Once the remaining projects were shut down and the scientists and staff dispersed, only several empty buildings in the rural Texas countryside, and fourteen miles of tunnel underneath it, remained of the once-ambitious facility.

At the National Museum of American History, planning for the Science in American Life exhibit—which would examine how science, technology, and American society have intersected over a hundred-year period—began in 1990, at the same time that preparations were being made in Texas to build the Super Collider. Early in the planning phases, Smithsonian curators decided to dedicate a section of the exhibit to the SSC. This section was intended to be a "work in progress" that would change over time as the collider was built, reflecting the current and ongoing debates over the massive machine.

The exhibition design called for using materials donated by both supporters and opponents of the SSC. Early in the exhibit's development the curators began contacting organizations and individuals who both supported and opposed the SSC, asking if they still had materials related to their efforts. Over a two-year period, the curators collected a wide range of items in more than twenty donations, ranging from bumper stickers, t-shirts and hats, to newspaper clippings, maps, and copies of state site proposals.

The design of the SSC portion of the Science in American Life exhibit became permanent with the closing of the SSC in late 1993. The SSC portion now focuses on the roles that special interest groups, protest, and grass-roots political campaigns play in large-scale scientific endeavors. Many of the donated items were included in the exhibit.

Notes:

1 DeMott, John S. and J. Madeleine Nash, "Super Push for a Supercollider,” Time, April 13, 1987, p. 19, Box 2, Folder 20.
2 “Alexander Narrative,” a brief typescript history of the New York CATCH organization, Box 3, Folder 14.
3 Koszczuk, Jackie. “Anti-SSC Felling CATCH-es On Fast,” Daily Star News (Fort Worth, Texas), September 17, 1988, p. 4, Box 2, Folder 5.


Scope and content

The SSC Collection, 1985-1992 (bulk 1987-1989), consists of a broad range of material, including original and photocopied news clippings, correspondence, bound volumes, oversized maps, posters, signs, handbills, leaflets, bumper stickers, press kits, certificates, lists of wells, transparencies, editorial cartoons, two photographs, and one videotape. The material dates from 1985 to 1992, with the bulk of the material dating from 1987 to 1989.

The collection is arranged into nine series, one for each of the eight finalist states and one for miscellaneous materials. Within each series, materials are grouped by the name of the donor.

The SSC Collection represents the "Not In My Back Yard Syndrome" (NIMBY) which many large public works projects face from local citizens who face disruption in their community. Because the collection reflects the research efforts of Museum curators over a limited time for use in a relatively small section of an exhibit, it is incomplete and selective in its representation of local support and opposition of the SSC. For example, the fact that the series for Arizona only contains materials that show support for the SSC does not mean that there was no opposition to siting the SSC in Arizona. Additionally, the collection does not represent opposition to the SSC by scientists who believed that the collider would siphon funds from other Federally-supported science projects.

A unique strength of the collection lies in its documentation of how different opposition groups responded to the same threat. Some groups were highly organized, their members being engineers and scientists who responded with sophisticated, scientifically-based arguments; some were looser groups that appealed to emotions or played on fears and rumors. The methods and tactics of both supporters and opponents are well documented in newspaper clippings, as well as in the publications and copies of public statements by group members.

The collection is also valuable as a "pre-history" of the now defunct SSC Project; site proposals from seven of the eight states, the 1988 and 1990 Department of Energy (DOE) environmental impact statements, and proposed site maps all provide background to the SSC from a state-level perspective prior to the actual creation of the collider.

The SSC project was canceled by Congress in 1993.


System of arrangement

Series 1, Arizona (Ian MacPherson), 1988, undated
Subseries 1, Ian McPherson, 1988, undated
Series 2, Colorado (Uriel Nauenberg), 1987
Subseries 1, Uriel Nauenberg, 1987-1988
Series 3, Illinois, 1987-1991, undated
Subseries 1, Fermi National Laboratory Library/Paula Garrett, undated
Subseries 2, David L. Gross, 1988, undated
Subseries 3, Sharon Lough, 1988-1991
Subseries 4: Stan L. Yonkauski, undated
Series 4, Michigan, 1988-1989
Subseries 1, Larry Jones, 1988-1989
Series 5, New York, 1986-1990
Subseries 1, Gail Adair, 1987
Subseries 2, Mary Lou and Jim Alexander, 1986-1990
Subseries 3, Bill Herbert, 1987
Subseries 4, Doug McCuen, 1987-1988
Subseries 5, Brian L. Petty, 1987-1988
Series 6, North Carolina, 1987
Subseries 1, Bill Dunn, 1987
Series 7, Tennessee, 1987-1992
Subseries 1, Robert and Pat Sanders, 1987-1992
Subseries 2, J. Fred Weinhold, 1987
Series 8, Texas, 1985-1990, undated
Subseries 1, Representative Joe Barton, undated
Subseries 2, Jean Caddel, 1986-1989
Subseries 3, Coby Chase, 1985-1989
Subseries 4, Red Oak Chamber of Commerce, 1990
Subseries 5, Waxahachie Chamber of Commerce, undated
Subseries 6, Mari Beth Williams, undated
Series 9, Miscellaneous, 1987-1988


Acquisition information

This collection was donated by individuals connected in various ways to the SSC. The items were donated from personal collections, official files, and the project archives of several different institutions. The donors were Gail Adair, Mary Lou and Dr. Jim Alexander, Representative Joe Barton, Jean Caddel, Coby Chase, Bill Dunn, the Fermi National Laboratory Library, David L. Gross, Bill Herbert, Larry Jones, Sharon Lough, Uriel Nauenberg, Doug McCuen, Ian McPherson, Andrea Miller, Brian L. Petty, the Red Oak Chamber of Commerce, Pat and Dr. Robert Sanders, the Waxahachie Chamber of Commerce, J. Fred Weinhold, Mari Beth Williams, and Stan L. Yonkauski. A brief statement identifying donors and their connections to the SSC accompanies each subseries in the container list.


Custodial history

Transferred from the Division of Science, Medicine, and Society on
October 6, 1995.


Related archival materials

When the SSC entered its termination phase in 1993, the Records Management Department of the project began grouping the official records of the SSC into five "disposition packages." These packages were in various stages of being assembled, shipped, received, and processed for research use and were dispersed to: the Fort Worth Regional Federal Records Center; Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory ("Fermilab") Archives; Niels Bohr Library, Center for History of Physics, American Institute for Physics; Ronald Reagan Presidential Library; and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Archives.


Access points

Subject/Topical:
Citizens Against the Collider Here (CATCH)
Environmental protection—Citizen participation
Environmental impact analysis
NIMBY Syndrome
Physics
Physicists
Superconducting Super Collider

Subject/Name:
Texas-Environmental protection

Form/Genre:
Brochures
Bumper stickers
Clippings—20th century
Correspondence—1980-2000
Handbills
Posters—20th century
Signs (declaratory or advertising artifacts)
Videotapes


Container listing

Box Folder  
    SERIES 1, ARIZONA (IAN MacPHERSON), 1988, UNDATED
    Subseries 1, Ian McPherson, 1988, undated
An independent attorney, Mr. McPherson headed the campaign to site the SSC in Arizona.
1 1 Arizona SSC Project Site Briefing Book, 1988
  2 Arizona and the Super Collider (brochure), undated
  3 Arizona for the Good Life (videotape), undated
    SERIES 2, COLORADO (URIEL NAUENBERG), 1987-1988
    Subseries 1, Uriel Nauenberg, 1987-1988
Dr. Nauenberg is a professor of physics at the University of Colorado at Boulder and directed the effort to locate the SSC in Colorado.
  4 National Media Coverage Report of Colorado and the SSC/DOE Deadline, Ketchum Public Relations, part 1, 1987 October
  5 National Media Coverage Report of Colorado and the SSC/DOE Deadline, Ketchum Public Relations, part 2, 1987 October
  6 Colorado SSC Outlook, November 1987, July 1988, and September 1988
  7 Colorado Site Proposal Pictures (photo prints and photonegatives), undated
    SERIES 3, ILLINOIS, 1987-1991, UNDATED
    Subseries 1, Fermi National Laboratory Library/Paula Garrett, undated
The Laboratory, also known as "Fermilab," was suggested as the site for the SSC in Illinois due to its already-existing Tevatron accelerator.
  8 Siting the Superconducting Super Collider in Illinois (book), undated
  9 SSC for Illinois (leaflet), undated
  10 SSC: The Case for Fermilab (pamphlet), undated
    Subseries 2, David L. Gross, 1988, undated
Dr. Gross is Senior Geologist and Assistant Chief of the Illinois State Geological Survey, which was responsible for determining the geology of the Illinois SSC site.
2 1 Siting the Superconducting Super Collider in Northeastern Illinois: Environmental Screening Atlas, undated
  O/S Folder 5 Illinois Site for the Proposed Superconducting Super Collider (map), 1988
  O/S Folder 5 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider inIllinois, Figure 3-1a, East Sector/Main Campus, (map), 1987
  O/S Folder 5 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider in Illinois, Figure 3-1b, "West Sector/Far Experimental Areas, (map), 1987
2 2 SSC for Fermilab, Vol. IV, Winter 1988
  3 SSC: The Case for Fermilab (pamphlet), undated
  4 SSC for Illinois (press kit), undated
    Subseries 3, Sharon Lough, 1988-1991
Ms. Lough directed the Citizens Against the Collider Here (CATCH) Campaign in Illinois.
  5 SSC: Illinois CATCH (clippings), 1988, 1989 and undated
  6 CATCH Illinois (letterhead), undated
  O/S Folder 1 SSC CATCH Illinois (poster), undated
2 7 Jones, Craig. "Superconducting Super Collider: An Accurate Appraisal, a Heartland Policy Study," Heartland Perspective, 1988 October 26.
  8 Jones, Craig. "Saved from the SSC, a Heartland Perspective," Heartland Perspective, 1991 September 27
    Subseries 4, Stan L. Yonkauski, undated
Dr. Yonkauski is a University of Illinois physics professor active in the campaign to site the SSC in Illinois.
  9 Support CATCH Illinois (bumper sticker), undated
  O/S Folder 2 Proclamation from State of Illinois, undated
    SERIES 4, MICHIGAN, 1988-1989
    Subseries 1, Larry Jones, 1988-1989
A physics professor at the University of Michigan, Dr. Jones was active in supporting the SSC in Michigan.
2 10 Siting the Superconducting Super Collider in Michigan: A Report to the Governor, the Legislature and the People of Michigan by the Michigan Superconducting Super Collider Commission, 1989
  11 Siting the Superconducting Super Collider in Michigan: Supplementary Data Submitted to the Department of Energy, 1988
  12 Yes! Superconducting Super Collider (bumper sticker), undated
  O/S Folder 2 Certificate, appointing Larry Jones to SSC Commission, 1988
  O/S Folder 2 Certificate, Michigan Concurrent Resolution #10, 1988
2 13 Stockbridge on Target (leaflet), undated
  O/S Folder 4 Michigan Stockbridge Site (map), undated
  O/S Folder 4 Figure 5.1-1, Land Use, Vegetation Cover and Wetlands (map), undated
  O/S Folder 4 Figure 5.1-2, Surface Water Resources (map), undated
2 14 SSC for Fermilab (newsletter), Vol. IV, Winter 1988
  15 The Super Collider in the West: The Arizona Edge (pamphlet), undated
  O/S Folder 1 Superconducting Super Collider SSC (poster), undated
  O/S Folder 1 We've Got What it Takes! Michigan (poster), undated
    SERIES 5, NEW YORK, 1987
    Subseries 1, Gail Adair, 1987
Ms. Adair was a member of the CATCH organization in New York.
5 23 A New York State Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider Volume 4, Regional Resources, 1987
6 1 A New York State Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider Volume 5, Environment, 1987
  2 A New York State Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider Attachment D, Geotechnical Data, 1987
  3 A New York State Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider Attachment F, Compendium of Endorsement, 1987
  4 A New York State Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider Attachment G, Northeast Region High Technology Buyer's Guide, 1987
  5 A New York State Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider Attachment H, Private Financing Strategies for the SSC, 1987
    Subseries 2, Mary Lou and Jim Alexander, 1986-1990
The Alexanders, whose farm was threatened by the SSC, directed the New York CATCH organization which was instrumental in causing the state to withdraw its bid for the SSC. Alexander was a chemical engineer.
2 16 Articles of Association for C.A.T.C.H. in New York, undated
  17 SSC Proposal for Ontario (broadside), undated
  18 No Collider (bumper sticker), undated
  19 CATCH letterhead, address labels, and copies of handwritten donationletters, undated
  O/S Folder 3 "Supercollider Generates Explosive Debate," Times-Union (Rochester, New York), 1990 May 31
2 20 News clippings (photocopies), 1986-1988 and undated
  21 Editorial cartoons (photocopies), 1987 and undated
  22 Citizens of Wayne County (handbill), undated
  23 How a Supercollider Works . . . How Cuomo's Collider Works (handbill), undated
  24 No SSC Please (handbill), undated
  25 Picture of Mario Cuomo with Bull's-Eye (handbill), undated
  26 Senator Kehoe Is Comming [sic] to Williamson (handbill), undated
  27 CATCH Wants You to Know (leaflet), undated
  28 Letter, draft, upon removal of Rochester site from consideration, undated
    Map of Rochester, New York site, [1987 November?]
  29 Letters from Van Voorhis & Van Voorhis to President Reagan and James Decker, Department of Energy, and CATCH Environmental Preliminary Report, 1987
  30 Salmon Creek Quad Map (lists of wells), undated
2 31 Salmon Creek Quad Map, (lists of wells typescript), undated
3 1 Lists of wells, "Pultneyville," Blue Zone, Buffer Zone and Yellow Zone, undated
  2 Lists of wells, "Wells Ontario Quad Map," Lakeside, Trimble Road, and Boston Road, undated
  3 Lists of wells, "Williamson," Blue Zone and Buffer Zone, undated
  4 Map of Rochester Site and lists of SSC supporters, addresses and telephone numbers, undated
  5 A New York State Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, [vol. 1], 1987
  6 Issues and Answers about the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Proposed Rochester Site (pamphlet), undated
  7 Petition against Wayne County Super Collider, 1987
  8 Fairpoint Quad Map Report, with notes, undated
  9 CATCH group (photoprint), undated
  10 No SSC (poster), undated
  11 Community Celebration (sign), 1988
  12 No Collider (transparency), undated
  13 Save Our Quality of Life (transparency), undated
  14 Alexander Narrative, [CATCH-NY history], 1992
  15 CATCH Statement on the Inclusion of the Rochester/Wayne County Site on the NAS/NAE Qualifying List for the SSC, 1987
  16 Notes on the Safety of the SSC, 1987
  17 Questions and Answers on the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), 1987
6 6-10 The SSC in New York State (binders), 1988
    Subseries 3, Bill Herbert, 1987
Dr. Herbert, a scientist at Xerox, was a member of the New York CATCH organization.
  O/S Folder 9 Chart, mounted, Correlation of the Silurian Rocks in New York State, undated (originally printed 1959)
  O/S Folder 5 Map, half of main campus area, with terrain features, 1987
  O/S Folder 7 Map, mounted, with colored mylar overlays, photograph map of Rochester site, main campus/abort area, undated
  O/S Folder 8 Map, mounted, with colored mylar overlays, photographic map of Rochester site, far campus area, undated
  O/S Folder 4 Map, New York State, Rochester SSC Site, Topographic Base Map with SSC Alignment, Plate 3-1, undated
  O/S Folder 4 Map, New York State, Rochester SSC Site, Water Features and Water Quality Classifications, Plate 5-2, undated
  O/S Folder 5 Map, Rochester Site, main campus area, with roads, 3 copies, 1987
  O/S Folder 5 Map, Rochester Site, main campus area, with open water, creek, and wetlands legend, 3 copies, 1987
  O/S Folder 5 Map, Rochester Site, main campus area, with roads, colored dots and flags with numbers, 1987.
  O/S Folder 4 Map, "Real Property Map," undated
    Subseries 4, Doug McCuen, 1987-1988
Mr. McCuen served as counsel to New York Lieutenant Governor Stan Lundine, who was an active supporter of the New York bid for the SSC.
3 18 News clippings (photocopies), 1987-1988
  19 A New York State Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, the St. Regis Valley Site, 1987
  20 A New York State Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, the St. Regis Valley Site, Vol. 3, Geology and Tunneling, 1987
  21 A New York State Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, the St. Regis Valley Site, 1987
  22 A New York State Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, the Wallkill Valley Site, Vol. 1, Executive Summary, 1987
  23 Press releases, 1987 and undated
    Subseries 5, Brian L. Petty, 1987-1988
Mr. Petty was a college student who drew editorial cartoons about the SSC which were published in local anti-SSC newsletters.
  24 Editorial cartoons, original ink drawings, 6, 1987
  O/S Folder 4 Now I Know How David Felt! (cartoon), 1988
    SERIES 6, NORTH CAROLINA, 1987
    Subseries 1, Bill Dunn, 1987
Dr. Dunn, an independent scientist, was Project Director for the North Carolina SSC Project.
3 25 North Carolina and the Superconducting Super Collider, undated
6 11 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 2, Offer, Financial and Other Incentives, and Other Documents, 1987
  12 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 3, Geology and Tunneling, 1987
  13 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 4, Regional Resources, 1987
  14 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 5, Environment, 1987
  15 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 6, Setting, 1987
  16 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 7, Regional Conditions, 1987
  17 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 8, Utilities, 1987
  O/S Folder 4 North Carolina Regional Map, Superconducting Super Collider, map A-1, 1987
  O/S Folder 4 North Carolina Regional Map, Superconducting Super Collider, map B-3, 1987
  O/S Folder 4 North Carolina Regional Map, Superconducting Super Collider, map H-14, 1987
3 26 "Look at Your New Neighbor," (poster), undated
    SERIES 7, TENNESSEE, 1987-1992
    Subseries 1, Robert and Pat Sanders, 1987-1992
The Sanderses' home was threatened by the SSC, and they led an anti-SSC campaign. Dr. Sanders was head of the local Health Department, and focused on the potential environmental impact of the SSC.
5 1 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. I, 1988
  2 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II, 1988
  3 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II A 1, 1988, pp. 1-500
8 1 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II A 1, 1988, pp. 501-1,005
5 4 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II A 1, 1988, pp. 1,006-1,503
  5 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II A 1, 1988, pp. 1,504-2,006
8 2 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II A 1, 1988, pp. 2,007-2,508
5 6 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II A 1, 1988, pp. 2,509-3,007
8 3 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II A 1, 1988, pp. 3,008-3,512
5 7 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II A 1, 1988, pp. 3,513-3,986
  8 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II A 1, 1988, pp. 3,987-4,377
  9 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II A 2, 1988, pp. 1-320
  10 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II A 2, 1988, pp. 321-688
  11 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II A 3, 1988
  12 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II B, 1988, 1 of 3
  13 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II B, 1988, 2 of 3
  14 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. II B, 1988, 3 of 3
  15 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. III, 1988
  16 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. IV, Appendix 7, 1988
  17 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. IV, Appendix 8, 1988
  18 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. IV, Appendix 11, 1988
  19 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. IV, Appendices 1, 4, 6, 9, 10, 12-16, Errata and Revisions, 1988
  20 Final Environmental Impact Statement, Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. IV, Appendix 5, Errata, 1988
  21 Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 1, Main Report, 1990.
  22 Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 2, Public Comments, 1990.
3 27 No Collider in Tennessee (bumper sticker), undated
  O/S Folder 3 "Call It Super Clyde," Dallas Morning News, (Dallas, TX), 1988 November 29
3 28 News clippings (photocopies), 1987-1992 and undated
  29 Correspondence (photocopies), 1988
  30 Editorial cartoons (photocopies), 1987-1989
  31 Last Chance to Oppose the Super Collider (handbill), 1988
  32 Maps, miscellaneous, SSC site and local areas, undated
  33 Miscellaneous documents related to SSC opposition, 1988-1992 and undated
  34 The Supercollider Affects You! (pamphlet), 1988
  35 Petition, against SSC in Tennessee, undated
  36 "Sanders' Fashion 'American Gothic'," 1988; from left: Robert Sanders, Jr., Bob Sanders, Pat Sanders (photoprint)
  37 No SSC Please (sign), undated
  38 Statements, photocopies, in opposition to the SSC in Tennessee, 1988 and undated
    Subseries 2, J. Fred Weinhold, 1987
Mr. Weinhold was the Tennessee Valley Authority's Special Projects Manager and was involved in the state's effort to host the SSC.
6 11 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 2, Offer, Financial and Other Incentives, and Other Documents, 1987
  12 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 3, Geology and Tunneling, 1987
  13 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 4, Regional Resources, 1987
  14 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 5, Environment, 1987
  15 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 6, Setting, 1987
  16 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 7, Regional Conditions, 1987
  17 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider, Vol. 8, Utilities, 1987
  O/S Folder 6 [Vol. 9], 1:24,000-Scale Base Mapping for Proposed Location of SSC Facilities and Regional Geography
3 39 Book, Tennessee White Paper: Condensed Version: Hydrogeology of the Snail Shell Cave, Overall Creek Drainage Basin and Ecology of the Snail Shell Cave System, undated
  40 SSC for Tennessee, undated
  41 Correspondence, regarding donation of materials, 1992
  O/S Folder 6 Map, "Prime Farmland of the 4-County Project Site Area," Figure 9.1.3-1, undated
  O/S Folder 6 SSC Region map, undated
  O/S Folder 6 Noise Receptors and Terrain Features Impacting Noise map,Figures 9.5-1 to 9.5-26, [Tennessee SSC site], 26 sheets, undated
3 42 Photoprints, aerial, 3, of SSC site, undated
  43 Photoprints, SSC main campus scale model, 2 sets of 2 prints, undated
  44 SSC for Tennessee (press kit), undated
    SERIES 8, TEXAS, 1986-1989, UNDATED
    Subseries 1: Representative Joe Barton, undated
Representative Barton was an active supporter of and lobbyist for locating the SSC in Texas.
  45 Ennis, Texas, Super Collider Country bumper sticker, undated
    Subseries 2, Jean Caddel, 1986-1989
Ms. Caddel was an organizer of the Texas opposition group.
4 1 Final Site Selection Process for DOE's Super Collider, U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), Federal Research, 1989
  2 Imported Fire Ants: Life History and Impact, Texas Department of Agriculture, 1986
  3 Environmental Survey, Preliminary Report Fermi Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois, (book excerpt), 1988
  4 No Radioactive Groundwater, No Supercollider (bumper sticker), undated
  5 Warning SSC Lies Below (bumper sticker), undated
  O/S Folder 3 Supercollider Will Be Expensive Disaster, Dallas Peace Times (Dallas, Texas), undated
  O/S Folder 3 "$8.3 Billion Question," Houston Post, (Houston, Texas), 1991 October 27-30
  O/S Folder 1 Build High Speed Rail Not a Proton Superhighway (poster), undated
    SSC Is a Big Lie (poster), undated
    Stop the SSC, Low Level Radiation Kills (poster), undated
4 6 Newspaper clippings (photocopies), 1988-1990 and undated
  7 Correspondence, Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority and the Sierra Club, 1987-1988
  8 Miscellaneous documents related to SSC opposition in Texas, 1990 and undated
  9 SCAN, Super Collider Accountability Network, Reports No. 3-15, 1990-1991
  10 No Radioactive Groundwater No Supercollider (sign), undated
  11 Warning SSC Lies Below (sign), undated
    Subseries 3, Coby Chase, 1985-1989
Mr. Chase was a senior official at the SSC Laboratory in Texas.
  12-13 Site Proposal for the Superconducting Super Collider in Illinois, Vol. 1, Executive Summary, 1987
  14 Newspaper clippings (photocopies), 1985-1989 and undated
  15 Correspondence (photocopies), 1987-1989
  16 Republican Tom Luce (handbill), undated
  17 "USA/SSC" on obverse, "TexaSSC" on reverse (handbill), undated
  18 Arizona and the Super Collider (leaflet), undated
  19 Republican Tom Luce for Governor (leaflet), undated
  20 Press releases (photocopies and originals), 1988-1989
    Subseries 4, Red Oak Chamber of Commerce, 1990
Red Oak was one of the small Texas towns located near the SSC.
  21 Red Oak . . . Founders Day (pamphlet), 1990
    Subseries 5, Waxahachie Chamber of Commerce, undated
Waxahachie was the city located closest to the SSC main campus and was therefore considered to be the "home" of the facility.
  22 I [love] Waxahachie, the Super Collider Capital (bumper sticker), undated
  23 Waxahachie, The Right Choice, The Super Collider Capitol (bumper sticker), undated
  24 Waxahachie, Texas, the Center of Attention, Home of the Super Collider (bumper sticker), undated
  25 A Member of Waxahachie's Winning Team (memo pad), undated
  O/S Folder 2 Waxahachie, Texas Welcomes the SSC (stickers), undated
    Subseries 6, Mari Beth Williams, undated
Ms. Williams was a local businesswoman and supporter of the SSC.
4 26 Palmer, Home of the Supercollider East Campus (bumper sticker), undated
    SERIES 9, MISCELLANEOUS, 1987-1988
  27 Invitation for Site Proposals for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), 1987
  28 SSC Site Evaluations, 1988
  29 Siting the Superconducting Super Collider, NRC, undated
  O/S Folder 3 News-Tribune (Brush-Morgan County, Colorado), Vol. 93, No. 34, 1987 August 26
  O/S Folder 3 Daily News (Ennis, Texas), 198? Nov. 10
  O/S Folder 3 "Collider: America's Project?" Daily News Journal, (Rutherford County, Tennessee), 1988 March 27
  O/S Folder 3 Daily Light (Waxahachie, Texas), 1988 November 10

 

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Last Update: 8 May 2008

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